Most annoying thing about Docker’s swarm mode

The most annoying thing about running a Docker swarm — something that for the most part was pretty easy to set up and get going, has to be the flood of log messages that dockerd generates.

According to this issue of github, fixing it “will require a code change, at the moment not being a breaking issue that creates traffic disruption is not getting much priority.”

So, I had to dig around in a part of Linux admin I had not touched in year: rsyslog. It was actually pretty simple to squelch these log messages, thanks to this page.

I use Ubuntu, and the fix is to add the following to the start of /etc/rsyslog.d/50-default.conf: :msg, contains, "Node join event" ~. After that, a sudo service rsyslog restart and, blammo, no more log spam on the swarm master nodes.

Annoyance-as-a-service

So, I’ve been looking for a new side project for a while, before finally settling on playing around with some phone APIs.  Not sure what else to do, I opted to make a tool for annoying people.  Try it now.

It’s quite simple, but effective none the less.  For a modest fee (starting  at $1.00), you can automate calling a friend with a random, annoying sound.  You can play around with things such as the caller ID to any valid phone number (to help make sure that they’ll answer the phone) or even scheduling the call for maximum annoyance.

Get using the cloud to annoy people!

Using ElasticSearch As a Data Source in Django Tutorial

We use ElasticSearch in many different ways at the company I work for.  Since we’re partly a Django shop, we decided to put together a little walk-through tutorial on building a Django app.

In this app, we’re using ElasticSearch as the backing data store for everything related to the tutorial.  Part 1 of the ElasticSearch and Django Tutorial is available.  As a fun side note, the blogging app itself is really a re-skinned version of the tutorial app.  You can fork the code and get started.

 

Google PageSpeed and How I Learned To Love The mod

I’ve spent a lot of time fighting against plugins and WordPress in general in attempt to get my Google PageSpeed over 90. I had basically given up on getting into the high 90s due to my reliance on some external resources that don’t set long expire times or, in at least 2 cases, sheer laziness in not wanting to combine and minify external CSS or JS resources myself.

Over the last week, however, I decided to give site optimizations one last go and finally got my PageSpeed over 90 — to 93 on my front page to be exact. I also managed to get YSlow up to a B — it’s an A if I use the “small blog or site” ruleset.

How’d I do it? Read below the fold for the step-by-step.
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